Electronic Travel Ban for Flights Coming to the US from the Middle East and Africa

Aeroporto Internacional Rainha Alia in Amman, Jordan

On Tuesday, the US Department of Homeland Security announced the introduction of an electronic device ban for flights coming to the US from 10 airports in the Middle East and Africa.

The Department of Homeland Security released this statement, “Evaluated intelligence indicates that terrorist groups continue to target commercial aviation and are aggressively pursuing innovative methods to undertake their attacks, to include smuggling explosive devices in various consumer items. Based on this information, Secretary of Homeland Security John Kelly and Transportation Security Administration Acting Administrator Huban Gowadia have determined it is necessary to enhance security procedures for passengers at certain last point of departure airports to the United States.

These enhancements apply to 10 specific airports. The affected overseas airports are: Queen Alia International Airport (AMM), Cairo International Airport (CAI), Ataturk International Airport (IST), King Abdul-Aziz International Airport (JED), King Khalid International Airport (RUH), Kuwait International Airport (KWI), Mohammed V Airport (CMN), Hamad International Airport (DOH), Dubai International Airport (DXB), and Abu Dhabi International Airport (AUH).

The aviation security enhancements will include requiring that all personal electronic devices larger than a cell phone or smart phone be placed in checked baggage at 10 airports where flights are departing for the United States.”

Many of the eight affected airlines seemed to have been blindsided by the news. The US Federal Aviation Administration, released this statement, “Rechargeable and non-rechargeable lithium batteries, cell phone batteries, laptop batteries, external batteries, portable rechargers.

Spare (uninstalled) lithium ion and lithium metal batteries must be carried in carry-on baggage only. When a carry-on bag is checked at the gate or at planeside, all spare lithium batteries must be removed from the bag and kept with the passenger in the aircraft cabin. The battery terminals must be protected from short circuit.

This covers spare lithium metal and spare rechargeable lithium ion batteries for personal electronics such as cameras, cell phones, laptop computers, tablets, watches, calculators, etc. This also includes external battery chargers (portable rechargers) containing a lithium ion battery. For lithium batteries that are installed in a device (laptop, cell phone, camera, etc.), see the entry for “portable electronic devices, containing batteries” in this chart.

Read more at Department of Homeland Security

About CR Thelin

CR Thelin is a creative writer for Enterprise2day. His recent role added to his plate is reporter. You can find CR wearing orange at most local events taking video and interviewing those involved. "Life is like riding a bicycle to keep your balance you must keep moving." - Albert Einstein.
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