Enterprise Stories-In Memory of Those Who Gave All

Memorial Day is the official beginning of summer for many of us as we spend time with our families camping, having a barbeque, or taking a trip to the cemetery to place flowers on the graves of our loved ones. In the midst of these activities, take a few minutes to remember the ones who died protecting the freedoms we enjoy.

This Memorial Day we pay tribute to the men listed below. “All gave some…some gave all.”

WORLD WAR I

Alton Hiatt

Alton Hiatt was the third son and fifth child of Frank Hiatt and Emma Platt. He was born April 22, 1894, at Hamblin on the Mountain Meadows in Washington County, Utah. He grew up on the Meadows, at Pinto, and at Enterprise. He attended the school system at Pinto and Enterprise. When World War I came Alton was drafted. He was sent to Europe and fought in the bloody campaigns of that war. At the battle of Aragon Forest on October 9, 1918, he died in battle. He was buried in France along with the dead of that and many other battles. His mother was allowed to visit his gravesite. He did not marry.1

Alton Hiatt's draft card. Photo credit: Ancestry.com

Alton Hiatt’s draft card.
Photo credit: Ancestry.com

Military Information

Rank: Private

Service: U.S. Army

Regiment: 109th Infantry Regiment, 28th Division

Burial Plot: A Row 10 Grave 20, Meuse Argonne, American Cemetery, Romagne, France2

Emma Hiatt was able to visit her son Alton's grave in France. Photo credit: "A Century of Enterprise"

Emma Hiatt was able to visit her son Alton’s grave in France.
Photo credit: “A Century of Enterprise”

The Meuse Argonne American Cemetery in France. Photo credit: http://www.americanbattlegraves.com

The Meuse Argonne American Cemetery in France where Alton Hiatt is buried.
Photo credit: http://www.americanbattlegraves.com

The Meuse Argonne American Cemetery in France. Photo credit: http://www.americanbattlegraves.com

The Meuse Argonne American Cemetery in France.
Photo credit: http://www.americanbattlegraves.com

Ray C. Coleman

Ray Coleman was born on April 29, 1894 in Ogden, Utah, to James U. Coleman and Leah Mable Thompson. Ray eventually found his way to Enterprise where he was employed for the Forest Service for a time before joining the army. He was killed in action on July 18, 1918, at Chateau Thierry, France.3

Ray Coleman's draft card. Photo credit: Ancestry.com

Ray Coleman’s draft card.
Photo credit: Ancestry.com

WORLD WAR II

Alma S. Hunt

Photo credit: "A Century of Enterprise"

Photo credit: “A Century of Enterprise”

Alma Hunt was born on April 11, 1924 to Jonathan A. Hunt and Eliza M. Bauer. Alma was killed in action on July 12, 1944 in Normandy.

Dwight H. Jones

Photo credit: "A Century of Enterprise"

Photo credit: “A Century of Enterprise”

Dwight Jones was born on October 12, 1920 to Arthur Pidding Jones and Edna Hulet.

Dwight…was a happy youth, so full of life and laughter. He had so much living to do and such a short time to do it. He wanted to see, feel, smell, and touch all of life. Life was wonderful. He received his education at Enterprise High School where he was especially apt at spelling. This commendable ability won for him, while in the fourth grade, a watch for winning the “spelling bee” at school. He graduated from high school at the age of 16. As with his parents and his brothers and sisters, Dwight’s life was one dedicated to a constant faith in God and to the Church. He eagerly attended church meetings, learning and believing. In his youth, Dwight was always trying to invent something new and interesting. One of the strangest inventions was a two-wheeled cart with a seat built to hold two. He would hook his horse, Old Croppy (Croppy acquired the name when he got both ears frozen half off as a colt) to the cart. Dwight and his best friend, Irwin Truman, shared many good times traveling around the community on the cart. One afternoon his big sister, Agnes, who lived on a ranch, heard a clattering sound coming from the hill behind the house, and down the steep, tree and rock infested mountainside came Dwight and Irwin bouncing along in their topsy-turvy cart. Agnes stood breathlessly by, fearing each turn of the wheel would pitch them into an enormous heap on the cruel rocks, but the boys laughed triumphantly and yelled like wild Indians, landing safely in the back yard with an extravagant roar of success. When the “Jones Tribe” gathered as a family, Dwight would herd all of the children together and then instantly proceed to be their personal guardian and entertainer. He “doctored” their cuts and bruises, settled the arguments, and kept them generally happy, while the adults chattered, laughed, and enjoyed themselves. Dwight enlisted in the United States Army in World War II. He was trained in a tank division. While training at Indio, California, he married Lillian Prince (Born: 27 Feb 1925) from Washington, Utah. That was on April 26, 1942. But he was soon to leave her, for on August 3, 1942 he left the United States for Scotland, from there to England, and then to Iran, Algeria. He taught and trained Frenchmen in the French army. He was a sergeant in the Army and commander of a tank. There were five times that tanks were shot out from under him, but he never received a scratch. But then on October 17, 1944, he was killed in the service of his country when his tank was hit. It was at Livergnaus, Italy, ten miles from Bolegna. He was buried in Merandola Cemetery by the British. Later he was moved to an American cemetery in Italy, and then to the United States to Enterprise, Utah, where he was buried in a double funeral with his brother, Theone, who was killed in an automobile accident coming to the memorial services. Dwight never saw his son, Norman Dwight (Born 9-24-1942) since his son was born after he left the states. This was a terrible disappointment to Dwight. He so deeply loved children. Norman Dwight is married to Jeanne Corbridge and has two sweet children. They were sealed in the Salt Lake City Temple on December 11, 1968. Dwight was such a wonderful person, so full of life and always happy.4

Merril F. Laub

Photo credit: "A Century of Enterprise"

Photo credit: “A Century of Enterprise”

Merril F. Laub was born on March 22, 1922, to Milton Fay Laub and Celesta Luella Bowler. He was part of the 5th Cavalry Regiment and was killed on October 21, 1944, during the Battle of Leyte on Leyte Island in the Pacific.5

 

Ernest Arthur Pickering, Jr.

Photo credit: "A Century of Enterprise"

Photo credit: “A Century of Enterprise”

Ernest Arthur Pickering was born on October 21, 1919, to Ernest Arthur Pickering and Mary Ann Winsor. He was a sergeant in the Army, and was wounded on April 10, 1945, during the Battle of the Bulge. Arthur was unable to recover from his wounds and died on April 17, 1945. He was buried in the Netherlands at the Netherlands American Cemetery and Memorial.6

Article found on Findagrave.com

Article found on Findagrave.com

Ernest Pickering's grave site in the Netherlands Photo credit: Findagrave.com

Arthur Pickering’s grave site in the Netherlands
Photo credit: Findagrave.com

Donald Lewis Price

Donald Lewis Price was born on November 14, 1922, to Joseph Adelbert Price and Dora Belle Rencher. He was killed in a plane crash during a final training exercise on August 10, 1944, in Florida. He was married to Dorothy LaVon Cromar Price.7

Death record for Donald Lewis Price Photo credit: Ancestry.com

Death record for Donald Lewis Price
Photo credit: Ancestry.com

George Glendon Tait

Photo credit: "A Century of Enterprise"

Photo credit: “A Century of Enterprise”

George Glendon Tait was born on April 9, 1920, to George Huntsman Tait and Laura Sophia Staheli. George was the oldest of 7 children. He married Maxine Jones on September 24, 1943, in the St. George Temple while home on a week furlough from the Army Air Corps. Just over a year later, in November 1944, Maxine received a telegram informing her that Glendon was listed as “missing in action.” Glendon was officially declared dead the following year by the government.8

Article source: FamilySearch.org

Article source: FamilySearch.org

 

Amos Franklin Terry, Jr.

Photo credit: "A Century of Enterprise"

Photo credit: “A Century of Enterprise”

Amos F. Terry was born on October 17, 1917, to Amos Franklin Terry and Eunetta Elliker. He was killed in training on June 29, 1943, in Riverside, California.9

 

VIETNAM

Sheldon D. Bowler

Photo credit: "A Century of Enterprise"

Photo credit: “A Century of Enterprise”

Sheldon Bowler was born on February 9, 1941 to Don and Theda Bowler. Sheldon died on November 22, 1967, in a plane crash, after arriving in Vietnam, on his way to reporting to his new unit. He was in the 90th Replacement BN, USARV, Army of the United States serving as a Private.10

 

IN FLANDERS FIELDS

John McCrae

In Flanders fields the poppies blow

Between the crosses, row on row,

That mark our place; and in the sky

The larks, still bravely singing, fly

Scarce heard amid the guns below.

 

We are the Dead. Short days ago

We lived, felt dawn, saw sunset glow,

Loved and were loved, and now we lie

In Flanders fields.

 

Take up our quarrel with the foe;

To you from failing hands we throw

The torch; be yours to hold it high.

If ye break faith with us who die

We shall not sleep, though poppies grow

In Flanders fields.

 

*Though I wished to find stories and photos for each person, I was unable to do so. If you have information, stories, or photos for any of these men, please email it to me: stacee@enterprise2day.com.

Sources:

  1. Platt, Lyman D. Ph.D. The Platt Family History. Volume 4.1. Page 393.
  2. http://www.americanbattlegraves.com/index.php?page=directory&rec=186898
  3. https://familysearch.org/photos/stories/4378818
  4. John Pidding Jones, His Ancestors and Descendants. P. 235-236
  5. Ancestry.com
  6. Findagrave.com and FamilySearch.org
  7. Ancestry.com
  8. Reeve, Paul W. A Century of Enterprise. P. 173.
  9. FamilySearch.org
  10. com. http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=60300

About Stacee Seegmiller

Stacee is a writer for Enterprise2Day and enjoys a good story, especially about Enterprise. She enjoys the small-town life with her husband and three children.
Author: Stacee Seegmiller
Tags

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *